Science News

COP26: UK 'nowhere near' meeting targets agreed at Glasgow climate summit

Ministers are told they must agree tougher policies to get the UK on track to meet goals set at COP26.

New plan to pay farmers who protect winter soil

The empty brown fields of winter countryside could be transformed under new land subsidy rules for England.

Prints Long Thought to Be Bear Tracks May Have Been Made by Human Ancestor

New research published in the journal Nature suggests that the prints, discovered in Tanzania in 1976, were left by an unidentified hominin, or early human ancestor, more than 3.6 million years ago.

2021 hurricane season was third most active

The 2021 Atlantic hurricane season has now officially ended, and it's been the third most active on record.

This Dinosaur Found in Chile Had a Battle Ax for a Tail

While ankylosaurs are already known for their armor and club tails, this specimen from South America had a unique way of fighting predators.

Scientists claim big advance in using DNA to store data

Scientists say they have made a major step forward in storing information in molecules of DNA.

This Dinosaur Found in Chile Had a Battle Ax for a Tail

While ankylosaurs are already known for their armor and club tails, this specimen from South America had a unique way of fighting predators.

Cyclist deaths soar on rural roads in England

The number of cyclists being killed on rural English roads rose sharply over the last year.

Rules to create gene-edited farm animals must put welfare first - review

An ethics body publishes a report as the government considers whether to allow gene-edited farm animals.

This Extinct Eagle May Have Gulped Guts Like a Vulture

Scientists suggest the largest eagle that ever existed hunted down its 500-pound prey and then stuck its head inside to gorge on organs.

NASA Delays Spacewalk, Citing Space Debris Threat to Astronauts

The agency did not link the postponement of repairs to wreckage caused by a recent Russian antisatellite weapon test.

Wood Wide Web: Scientists to map hotspots of fungal life

The fungal networks in soil can help fight climate change but are under threat, experts say.

Omicron Has Scary Mutations. That Doesn't Mean They Work Well Together

Mutations can work together to make a virus more fearsome, but they can also cancel one another out. This phenomenon, called epistasis, is why scientists are reluctant to speculate on Omicron.

As World Shuts Borders to Stop Omicron, Japan Offers a Cautionary Tale

Japan, which has been very cautious throughout the pandemic, is again barring all nonresident foreigners. There is an economic and human cost.

As World Shuts Borders to Stop Omicron, Japan Offers a Cautionary Tale

Japan, which has been very cautious throughout the pandemic, is again barring all nonresident foreigners. There is an economic and human cost.

Stamping Bar Codes on Cells to Solve Medical Mysteries

By tracking every cell in an organism, scientists are working out why certain cancer treatments fail, which could lead to improved medicine.

Does Omicron Cause Only Mild Illness? Too Early to Tell, Experts Say

Should the Omicron variant cause severe illness, that will become apparent if there is a significant rise in hospitalizations over the next week or two, one expert said.

This Fire-Loving Fungus Eats Charcoal, if It Must

Some of the fungi sprout in fiery shades of orange and pink after wildfires, feasting on what was left behind by the burn.

A Cure for Type 1 Diabetes? For One Man, It Seems to Have Worked.

A new treatment using stem cells that produce insulin has surprised experts and given them hope for the 1.5 million Americans living with the disease.

The Arctic Ocean Was Invaded by Its Neighbor Earlier Than Anyone Thought

The saltier Atlantic broke through layers of ice and freshwater, contributing to the Arctic’s warming.

Merck Says Its Covid Pill Is Less Effective in a Final Analysis

The drug, molnupiravir, reduced the risk of hospitalization and death in high-risk Covid patients by 30 percent. An earlier analysis had found a 50 percent reduction.

Interior Dept. Report on Drilling Is Mostly Silent on Climate Change

The department recommended higher fees for oil and gas leases, but there was no sign the government planned to take global warming into account when weighing new applications.

Texas Abortion Law Complicates Care for Risky Pregnancies

Doctors in Texas say they cannot head off life-threatening medical crises in pregnant women if abortions cannot be offered or even discussed.

Texas Abortion Law Complicates Care for Risky Pregnancies

Doctors in Texas say they cannot head off life-threatening medical crises in pregnant women if abortions cannot be offered or even discussed.

Upcoming Moon missions spur the search for new spacesuits

Nasa has asked the private sector to design new spacesuits that can be used on the Moon.

Climate Change Threatens Smithsonian Museums

Beneath the National Museum of American History, floodwaters are intruding into collection rooms, a consequence of a warming planet. A fix remains years away.

Roman mosaic and villa complex found in Rutland farmer's field

The mosaic, part of a villa complex, is said to be one of the most significant found in Britain.

C.D.C. Eases Up on Dog Travel Ban

The agency will now allow some pets to be brought back into the United States from 113 countries considered as high risk for rabies.

The Gene-Synthesis Revolution

Researchers can now design and mass-produce genetic material — a technique that helped build the mRNA vaccines. What could it give us next?

NASA's DART Mission Is Punching a Killer Asteroid to Save Humanity

The Double Asteroid Redirection Test spacecraft, launched on Wednesday, could be the first to alter an asteroid’s path, a technique that may be used to defend the planet in the future.